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Life as a Disability Support Worker

Working as a disability support worker gives you the opportunity to help people in their own homes and improve their lives through both physical and emotional support. You might do any or all of these things:

  • Assist people to perform important daily activities
  • Facilitate daily personal hygieneand dressing tasks
  • Perform home-based taskssuch as food preparation and housework
  • Undertake tasks outside the home such as shopping
  • Social activities
  • Provide emotional support and friendship

This is a rewarding and in-demand career.

Connection & Mentoring

"If you want to go fast, go alone. If you want to go far, go with others."

- African Proverb

Whatever work you do and wherever you do it, you do it better if you have a solid support network behind you. The people who work in our sector are fantastic at supporting others – precisely the type of people you would want in your own support network. The irony here, however, is that your strength in offering support can sometimes mean your own needs get overlooked. Our network of NDP members can enhance your skill-set and complement your networks of support. Connect with them today!

ACT Workforce Impact Collective

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The Workforce Impact Collective (WIC) was developed with the aim of ensuring our community has the disability frontline workforce with the quality, capacity, and sustainability required to contribute to people living with disability having greater choice and control to meet their lifestyle and choices. Find out more below:

Here are a selection of recorded webinars, specifically for disability support workers.

 What makes a good frontline worker?

 

Delivering quality services in a rural context


 

Just Checking: It's time to have a chat about cancer prevention

 

Outing Disability: How to be more LGBTIQ Inclusive

 

Person-centred emergency preparedness toolkit

 

Person-centred risk management: tips for disability support workers

 

Making a person-centred approach real for the people you support

 The growing need for autism training in an inclusive world