HomeAllied Health HubAllied Health and Disability Virtual Conference

Allied health disability service demand has expanded dramatically across all of the diverse professional disciplines. With the person with disability at the centre of allied health practice new, practice and business models are required. All allied health practitioners need guidance to develop their skills and connections to evolve from multi-disciplinary into full interdisciplinary service delivery across Australia. 

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PROGRAM & VIDEO RECORDINGS 

Keynote Address - The dance with technology - how do we ensure we lead?
Presenter
Dr Fiona Kerr, The NeuroTech Institute
Fiona presents an impressive and thought provoking keynote about the neurophysiological effects for interaction between humans and technology. She discusses how the brain is shaped by our interaction with others, and will be shaped by our interactions with the many machines in our lives. How do we ensure that we take full advantage of both humans and technology going forward?

CONCURRENT SESSIONS

Private Practice Stream Sector Developments Stream
Supporting practitioners in business
Presenter
Nardine Presland, Member Development Advisor, ESSA
Allied Health - Disability and Health Interface
Presenter
Mary Hawkins, Director Strategic Initiatives
NDIS Q&S - Behavioural Practitioners
Presenter
Kerrie Hancox, Director, Behavioural Support, NDIS Commission
The NDIS and person centred practice in Allied Health online
Presenter
Edward Johnson, Co-founder and Chief Clinical Officer, Umbo
Walking the Support Coordination Tight Rope: Managing Expectations    
Presenter
Anne Alexander, Specialist Support Coordinator
Supervision & Delegation framework for Allied Health Assistants and the support workforce in disability   
Presenter
Annette Davis, Monash Health


Keynote Address - Allied health workforce capacity: key issues and emerging opportunities

Presenter
Katie Bourke, Specialist Coordinator - Allied Health, Boosting the Local Care Workforce
This seesion starts with an overview of the Boosting of the Local Care Workforce program, how are building an understanding of the sector and supporting providers. We then take a look at the current supply and demand for allied health professionals nationally, before exploring some of the issues and opportunities for allied health providers emerging from the BCLW program conversations.

CONCURRENT SESSIONS

Interdisciplinary Practice Stream                 Sector Developments Stream
The Allied Health Rural Generalist Pathway
Presenter
Cath Maloney, CEO, SARRAH
Can I delegate this Allied Health task?
Presenter
Tilly Waite, Teacher-Allied Health Assistance, WodongaTAFE
Clinical Excellence in Short Term Intervention
Presenters
Alison O'Toole / Cathy Crane, Cerebral Palsy Alliance                                                                        



Entwining Allied Health Assistants into practice
Presenter
Gail Bennell, Industry Relationship Lead-Community Services, TAFE NSW

Leveraging the vocationally trained sector to straighten the Allied Health workforce                              Presenter
Nerida Volker, Industry Relatoionship Lead - Allied Health, TAFE NSW
Community InterD practice
Presenter
Deanne Wilson, SA Spinal Cord Injury Service
ROAM  - Remote Orientation and Mobility
Presenter
Amy Barrett-Lennard, Orientation & Mobility Specialist and OT, ROAM

 

Sole Trader                          
Presenter                                    
Mikaela Paterson - Financial health                     
Presenter 
Flinders University - Innovation               


Keynote Address - Royal Commission Readiness

Presenter
Henry Newton, Senior Policy Officer, National Disability Services 

 CASE STUDIES

 Video Recordings for Case Study 1: Paul

Presenter
 Cathy Olson, Speech Pathologist

Presenter
 Camilla Williams, Exercise Physiologist

Presenter
 Andrea Douglas, OT

Presenter
 Daniella Florio, Podiatrist

 Case Study 1: Paul

Paul is a 19 year old man who lives at home with his father. Paul has an intellectual disability which has impacted on his speech and learning. During his final year of school his mother was killed in a car accident, in which Paul was severely injured. Following his physical recovery and release from hospital, he started to exhibit symptoms of depression. Pauls left leg was amputated above the knee as a result of the accident, and as such he requires ongoing physical therapy and eventually will require a prosthesis. Paul struggles to remain engaged in his therapy and often misses appointments because he doesn’t feel like going. He often complains of a headache as the reason he doesn’t want to go. Paul’s father has left his job to care for Paul.

Questions

1. What information would you require before deciding on services for Paul?

2. What services would you provide?

3. When would you contact/refer Paul to another service

4. How would you determine which services would be suitable for Paul?

5. How would you find these services?

6. Once you had linked Paul to other services how would you provide an interdisciplinary care environment?

7. What are some of the barriers to good interdisciplinary practice?

Video Recordings for Case Study 2: Wendy

 Presenter
 Tal Araten-Bergman, Social Worker

 Presenter
 Therese Iacano - Rural and Retional Allied Ghealth

Presenter
 Natalia Kelly - Orthoptis

Presenter
 Kathryn Toohey - Dietician

 Case Study 2: Wendy

Wendy is a 19 year old woman who loves watching films, painting and listening to music.  She currently lives with her mother Sophia and her 21 year old sister Ruth a first year University student,  Wendy has an intellectual disability which has impacted on her speech and learning and visual impairment that manifests as difficulty with processing of visual information. Wendy attends a day centre for three days a week, she really enjoys the Day Centre where she has been given Her own shelf in the art room and painting with her friends. People who don’t know Wendy find her speech difficult to understand and she sometimes uses Key Word Signs or pictures to clarify her meaning. When Wendy becomes anxious or worried. She can be aggressive even towards those who She knows well. Also due to her poor communication skills she finds expressing her self very difficult and sometimes frustrating. Wendy is able to complete her personal care, engages in household and meal planning and assists with some meal preparation activities, although she does sometimes need prompting or supervising depending on her mood that day.   Wendy is very interested in activities in the community. Although she is mobile, she is at times unsteady on her feet. She does require support when in the community as she could be extremely vulnerable.  Sophia (Wendy’s mother) is devoted to Wendy and gave up her part time job to look after her full time.  Sophia finds it very difficult to leave Wendy at home for any length of time even though she is likely to be able to cope on her own for a few hours. She is concerned about Wendy’s tendency to eat unhealthy foods and her recent weight gain. Recently, Ruth (Wendy’s sister) has noticed that Wendy seems a little down. In talking to Wendy and letting her know her concerns, Wendy told Ruth she is bored and would really like the opportunity to live more independently. Wendy says she wants to get out more, make friends and go to movies and the shopping centre and not rely on her mum to get her to various activities. Sophia would like to leave “things as they are”. Sophia is also concerned for Wendy’s safety when she is away and would like support and respite so Sophia can take a break and continue helping Wendy with daily activities.

Questions

1. What information would you require before deciding on services for Wendy?

2. What services would you provide?

3. When would you contact/refer Wendy to another service?

4. How would you determine which services would be suitable for Wendy?

5. How would you find these services?

6. Once you had linked Wendy to other services how would you provide an interdisciplinary care environment?

7. What are some of the barriers to good interdisciplinary practice?